Tag Archives: Westminster

Theresa ‘more of the same’ May

And so the Tory power machine roles relentlessly onward, as it schemes, maligns and back stabs its hold on government. The lust for power by career politicians is becoming increasingly immoral, as they sound bite to the tune of constant research of public mood and attitude.

To endorse this, I am indebted to T J Green @greentak for making me aware of this insight from Jo Maugham QC on the electoral procedure from the 1922 committee. It suggests that a second candidate should have been found to replace Leadstrom. His interpretation of this issue has stimulated more debate than that which surrounded the leadership election!

Further controversy comes from the media highlighting the morality of our next Prime Minister and her stand over the Hillsborough cover up, support of gay marriage and confrontations with the police. Something strangely at odds with her condemnation of the handover of power in 2007, by Blair to Brown, without an election.

Gordon Brown “doesn’t have the mandate (and) wasn’t elected prime minister” rang the battle cry, with May contributing that he was “running scared of the people’s verdict.” How ironic that she now finds herself in an identical position and with an opposition in disarray, yet has vetoed going to the country.

For me, this repeat of 2007 takes politics to new depths. It sneers at the democratic process and involvement of the people, which was one of the reasons for our recent referendum and to which the people made their feelings known.

We are facing the most challenging time since the last world war, as we stand alone against overwhelming odds. To have a leader taking on this awesome situation with only the backing of 200 ‘friends’ smacks of arrogance and renewed contempt for the majority. We need to unite behind our government more so now than at any other time in decades. Surely she would be in a much stronger position with Brussels if she had the backing of the whole country?

Whilst seen as a tough operator she is, apparently, also a control freak, a luxury that cannot be indulged if her leadership is to be in anyway effective over such mighty challenges. There is no doubt she is charismatic in a way Corbyn could never be but so was Tony Blair and his single mindedness was his undoing.

(Isn’t it interesting how the Labour Party are looking to unseat their leader because of his limited support of the ‘Remain’ campaign, whilst the Tories have just elected their new leader and our Prime Minister, with the same credentials!)

In making her pitch, she said: “We need a government that will deliver serious social reform – and make ours a country that truly works for everyone. Because right now, if you’re born poor, you will die on average nine years earlier than others. If you’re black, you’re treated more harshly by the criminal justice system than if you’re white.

“If you’re a white working-class boy, you’re less likely than anybody else to go to university. If you’re at a state school, you’re less likely to reach the top professions than if you’re educated privately. If you’re a woman, you still earn less than a man.”

Hard hitting words that somehow seem at odds with the world of Tory reality. All political parties have need of their corporate sponsors to attain and retain their power. Her attacks on these vested interests may ring a bell with voters but are they ‘soundbite electioneering’ that will lose momentum with the passing of time? How much will the manipulated fears around Brexit control the degree of reform of existing corporate abuse and vast pay packets?

It also has to be said that she is not afraid of confrontation, as the police know full well. However, her vile immigrant campaign, with “Go Home” posters, places her somewhat at odds with the very serious challenges now facing us, with the growing resentment and persecution of immigrants.

Her words on education and the working class are obviously seeking to further disturb Labours current problems but very much at odds with the growing stranglehold of student debt and AI induced loss of jobs at all levels of employment.

These are soundbites we could do without. The situation is now far too serious for the can to be once again kicked down the road. What she lacks in vision will have to be more than made up for in tough negotiating. Apparently, she is admirably gifted to achieve these ends and like Cameron with his inauguration, she is making all the right noises.

However, we need leadership now more than ever before. Will an unelected transfer of power, which is only supported by a minority of the country, lead to more of the same at No 10 and the furtherance of ‘Austerity’, Privatisation, Fracking and TTIP? Only time will tell.

Until the next time

 

Thinking from his Book: Global Magna Carta. Returning Power to the 99% . . . If They Want It! By J T Coombes

The United States of Britain

UK photo

. . . “Looking after the working people” . . . “A united country” . . .

As these words stream off the lips of the new government, something not uttered before Election Day, we return to the world of government policy by soundbite, (if we ever left it!). Once they get their act together, hopefully, Labour will make mincemeat of the first and I would offer the following observations on the second.

Yes, we do need a ‘united’ country but one no longer united by Westminster. If this election has demonstrated one thing, people across the country have reached the end of their tether with successive governments eroding democracy by putting the needs of ‘Club Westminster’ before the rest of the country, from North Sea Oil to Fracking.

The earth scorching endorsement of this by the SNP in Scotland has been followed by news that the most popularly supported parties elsewhere are: Ireland – DUP, Wales – Labour and England – Tory.

Cameron’s is a knee jerk reaction to fighting the cause of a ‘united’ country. People have moved on, as Labour found to their cost and trying to glue the UK back together again under Westminster has also been seriously misdiagnosed.

At its heart is our political and corporate response to globalisation, by going ‘large’. The rise of global monopolies – ‘too big to fail’ – are now increasingly holding Society to ransom if governments try in any way to regulate them. TTIP will be the final nail in the coffin of democracy as their power is made absolute (and something only the SNP is fighting!).

What started out as a Common Market for trade in Europe has evolved into a European (political) Union that is now so remote from the people, who pay for it and elect its representatives into office, that democracy has become meaningless. The growing demand to take powers back from Brussels is evidence of this frustration.

BIG is forcing ever greater distance between the rich and the poor. With that distance comes impotence over how our daily lives are run. We have been reduced to bits of data and our wishes and frustrations no longer register on political or corporate spreadsheets.

‘Unity’ comes from recognising that village communities are better managed for the benefit of their members than towns or cities. Using this benchmark, we can create more actively managed democracies by bringing people closer to government.

Reaction to the election is an indication of the desire by people to become a ‘mini’ EU. This contribution to a debate is a thumbnail. The devil is in the detail and would not in any way dilute my excitement at such a development.

Uniting us as four self-ruling entities would invoke healthy competition through the freedom to develop our cultural differences. (A free education policy in Scotland demonstrates care and an investment in their young).

We are an Island race with a phenomenal history of successful innovation, something desperately needed in this new global world of technology and crying need for sustainability. Freed from the bureaucracy of Westminster and its suffocating corporate dominance, innovation would reign supreme.

Of course there has to be a central ‘Unifying’ force to replace Westminster. In this 800th year of Magna Carta, A Charter of Values, (constructed and ratified with the full involvement of the people), defining the common purpose of the four and holding them accountable, seems all that is needed . . . Why complicate it?!

Such values might include a debt free money supply for social infrastructure and small business development, people driven referendums, the development of sustainability programmes creating further new jobs, equality of gender and religious belief, independence of the internet and a curb on surveillance and personal freedoms, as a starter!

Matters of common interest, such as defence, immigration, fishing and sustainability of natural resources could be centralised in an equally represented and non-governmental ‘Council of Albion’, to maximise cost efficiencies on common issues. It would provide the ability to react collectively where necessary and offer a flexible infrastructure of ‘independent cooperation’ to meet global competition in chosen areas of trade.

We are at a crossroads now, where the UN would have us moving ever closer to Global Governance with its Global Sustainability Initiative for the entire Planet. What we have learned is that BIG produces wholesale abuse and makes people impotent to demanding accountability.

In the same way that small innovative businesses are the mainstay of a thriving corporate environment, so small democracies, like a United States of Britain, would breathe new life into a global democracy that is now on life support.

Until the next time.

 

Thinking from his Book: Global Magna Carta. Returning Power to the 99% . . . If They Want It! By J T Coombes